Five tips to protect against ransomware attacks

Ransomware attacks are one of the most common forms of cyber attack in Australia. How can you protect your business?

Ransomware hackers steal businesses’ files and demand ransom payments to get them back. The attacks can be devastating financially for companies that are not prepared.

For example, the WannaCry attack hit 200,000 victims in 150 countries.

If you run a business, follow these five tips to safeguard yourself and your business against such attacks.

1. Update your software

Pay close attention to the software you use. Emergence Insurance recommends you alway accepting options to update or patch your operating system and other key applications immediately updates are available. Updates are often designed to strengthen cyber security.

2. Install antivirus software

Regular software updates alone do not ensure your systems are protected. Viruses are still a threat because they constantly evolve. Guard against them by running a reputable antivirus tool and remember to update your software immediately when updates are available.

3. Use common sense on the internet

Be smart about not exposing yourself to cyber attacks. Think before you click on unfamiliar links and don’t open strange email attachments. Delete all emails that look suspicious.

4. Backup your files often 

Create backups of all your files often. It’s a simple, effective way to ensure that if ransomware thieves steal your files and hold them hostage, the thieves have no leverage against you.

5. Develop a cyber security plan

Develop a long-term plan to strengthen your business’s cyber security. It should include educating your employees; upgrading hardware and software; building a business continuity plan; and buying cyber insurance protection to safeguard your business financially in the event of a cyber attack.

 

Source

Emergence Insurance

Emergence Insurance is here to protect all businesses – large and small – against cyber risks. In fact, that’s all we do, so we’re the specialists in the field.

 

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Australian cyber threat to the private sector

Cyber Threat

The Cyber Threat to Australian Business may be larger than first thought with many Australian businesses refusing to report breaches due to concerns the disclosure may adversely affect their reputation or create legal or commercial liabilities.

In the second of the Australian Cyber Security Centres cyber threat report

Extract from  ACSC Threat Report 2016:

Australian industry is persistently targeted by a broad range of malicious cyber activity, risking the profitability, competitiveness and reputation of Australian businesses. The spectrum of malicious cyber activity ranges from online vandalism and cybercrime through to the theft of commercially sensitive intellectual property and negotiation strategies.

The ongoing theft of intellectual property from Australian companies continues to
pose significant challenges to the future competitiveness of Australia’s economy. In
particular, cyber espionage impedes Australia’s competitive advantage in exclusive
and profitable areas of research and development – including intellectual property
generated within our universities, public and private research firms and government
sectors – and provides this advantage to foreign competitors.

The ACSC’s visibility of cyber security incidents affecting industry and critical infrastructure networks is heavily reliant on voluntary self-reporting.
Some companies may be hesitant to report incidents to the government due to concerns the disclosure may adversely affect their reputation or create legal or commercial liabilities. For example, in some cases victim organisations have sought legal advice before reporting an incident.

Many cyber security incidents across the private sector are undetected or unreported. Increased reporting of cyber security incidents by the private sector would subsequently increase the ACSC’s knowledge of cyber adversaries who target Australian industry and critical infrastructure, and the methods they employ. This knowledge would further enable the development of cyber security advice and mitigation strategies.

The ACSC is making a dedicated effort to engage industry on cyber threats and associated mitigation strategies through a process of sustained engagement. However, the private sector’s ability and willingness to recognise the extent of the cyber threat and to implement mitigation strategies varies considerably across and within sectors. Generally, companies that have been extensively targeted or compromised are more likely to view the business risks associated with the cyber threat as sufficient to warrant investment in cyber security.

Those without direct experience of being targeted or a victim may not be aware of the potential economic harm malicious cyber activity can cause their businesses, do not
understand the value of the data they hold, and cannot conceive why they would be targeted.

 

Australian Cyber Threat

Between July 2015 and June 2016, CERT Australia responded to 14,804 cyber security incidents affecting Australian businesses

Between July 2015 and June 2016, CERT Australia responded to 14,804 cyber security incidents affecting Australian businesses, 418 of which involved systems of national interest (SNI) and critical infrastructure (CI).

CERT Australia relies heavily on the voluntary self-reporting of cyber security incidents from a wide variety of sources throughout Australia and internationally and therefore does not have a complete view of incidents impacting Australian industry.

Sources: www.acsc.gov.au

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Please note Cyberliabilitycomparison.com.au Insurance News is an information service sometimes provided by third parties Insure 247 Australia doesn’t warrants the accuracy of any information contained there in, readers should make their own enquiry’s before relying on information in the stories Terms of Service

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Please note that any advice given has been provided without taking into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. It is also based on information we have obtained from you. You must ensure the information is accurate and complete. Otherwise, this advice may be based on inaccurate or incomplete information. You should consider whether the advice is appropriate in light of your objectives, financial situation and needs